Kumquat Funny Little Fruit

Be sure to eat peel
fruit inside will leave bitter
taste behind – I’m a…
Kumquat

NaPoWriMo Prompt Day 27 – Many poems explore the sight or sound or feel of things, and Proust famously wrote about the memories evoked by smell, but today I’d like to challenge you to write a poem that explores your sense of taste! This could be a poem about food, or wine, or even the oddly metallic sensation of a snowflake on your tongue.

Welcome back to day 27 of NaPoWriMo. It is the last week of classes for Rachael, final exams are next week. As her gardening class has no final it is the last week. She has been bringing home some of the harvest including a few kumquats. This morning she told me how to eat them. I never thought about how to eat a kumquat before.

Nasturtium

Nasturtium-Tropaeolum

CC BY-SA 3.0, Link Wikipedia

Nasturtium leaves
add some zing to salad greens
with hint of radish

NaPoWriMo Prompt Day 5 – In honor of Mary Oliver’s work, I’d like to challenge you to write a poem that is based in the natural world: it could be about a particular plant, animal, or a particular landscape. But it should be about a slice of the natural world that you have personally experienced and optimally, one that you have experienced often. Try to incorporate specific details while also stating why you find the chosen place or plant/animal meaningful.

Here we are on day five of NaPoWriMo. On the first day I told you Rachael is taking an outdoor eduction course at ASU. She is also taking a garden class. She learned about the nasturtium flower and told us how it tasted like radishes. Well Mom wanted a taste and she brought home a couple leaves last week. Whew! They definitely have a kick.

Meanwhile Gretchen is not feeling well and stayed home from school today. Poor girl has slept the morning away. I need to get set up to work, the new adventure I told you about the last day of March. It is online so I am able to work from the comfort of home. Great gig for someone who can’t drive. I need to check on Gretchen to see if she needs anything before my work day begins.

If the little American sentence was not enough poetry to satisfy your nature needs, here is one I wrote on Desert Spring Silver Birch Press published a couple years ago. Enjoy the rest of First Contact day.

NaPoWriMo 2016 Day 5

 

HeirloomCarrots3516-thumb-596x350-166152

Honey Glazed Baby Carrots Photo Credit    

 

Little girl tugs on
green leaves, astonished to find
long orange carrot

Green leaves in garden
pique curiosity, how
can a long orange
carrot be found dangling
root vegetable hid from view

True story. When Rachael was 3 or 4, Dad had a garden in the backyard. One of the vegetables he planted were carrots. Now I don’t know if they were heirloom carrots, but long orange fit for my poem. Plus to a three year old yanking on green leaves to reveal an orange carrot… I wish we got a picture of the look on her face.

She saw the green leaves and asked her dad, “What is that?”

“Carrots.”

Oh no, he wasn’t going to fool her. She knew carrots were orange. Dad told her to pull on one of them. She did and an orange carrot came out of the ground. Here is the website I used to find heirloom carrot names.

NaPoWriMo Prompt – April is a time for planting things (at least where I am, in Washington DC – you may still be waiting for spring, or well into some other season!) At any rate, I’ve recently been paging through seed catalogs, many of which feature “heirloom” seeds with fabulous names. Consider the “Old Ivory Egg” tomato, the “Ozark Razorback” or “Fast Lady” cow-pea, “Neal’s Paymaster” dent corn, or the “Tongues of Fire” bush bean. Today, I challenge you to spend some time looking at the names of heirloom plants, and write a poem that takes its inspiration from, or incorporates the name of, one or more of these garden rarities. To help you out, here are links to the Southern Exposure Seed Exchange and the Baker Creek Seed Company. Also, here’s a hint – tomatoes seem to be prime territory for elaborate names. And who knows, maybe you’ll even find something to plant in your garden! Happy writing!

RIP Leonard Nimoy

Garden at Cosanti in Phoenix, AZ

Garden at Cosanti in Phoenix, AZ

Perfect moments lived
Memory cannot erase
Live long and prosper

Five days ago, Nimoy’s last tweet was:

‏@TheRealNimoy
“A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP”

Here’s to living in every moment and cultivating perfect memories. The beautiful garden picture was taken by my wonderful husband. Today is his birthday. Unfortunately now that he is 43, he is no longer the answer to everything in the universe. But come November I’ll be able to take over the answer department 😉

LLAP Spock you will be missed but not forgotten.