#NaPoWriMo Poetic Review

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Gretchen’s opinion of April 4 years ago

Pandemic

Covid
Shuts down country
Everyone stays home
Days begin to blend together
Virus
Brings economy to its knees
Can we reboot this year
Twenty-Twenty
Subpar

NaPoWriMo Prompt – And now for our (optional) prompt. Today, I’d like to challenge you to write a poem in the form of a review. But not a review of a book or a movie of a restaurant. Instead, I challenge you to write a poetic review of something that isn’t normally reviewed. For example, your mother-in-law, the moon, or the year 2020 (I think many of us have some thoughts on that one!)

Good morning and welcome to day twenty-seven of napowrimo. It just so happened that Gretchen’s review of April popped up in my Facebook memories today. I do believe she was growing tired of mom’s text replies coming in the form of haiku. Of course her not so rave review was also answered in haiku.

Cancel poetry
in April impossible
haiku are catching

Lol! Apparently I used Gretchen’s poetic review as inspiration for my poem on April 28, 2016. The final days of national poetry month also coincide with the last week of the spring semester. This has been one strange freshman year for Gretchen and senior year for Robin, and I’m not all too sure things will be back to normal by the fall semester. Robin’s cap and gown have arrived along with the summa cum laude honor cords. I will at least be able to share some great graduation photos on this blog. Other than that this year has not gone according to plan.

#NaPoWriMo Digging

 

Outdoor Life

Temperatures start to rise
backyard Oasis
now a hot desert
black sunshade hangs over
morning coffee stop
blocking bright yellow sun
how long will this heat last?

Tortoise digs in the
rich brown dirt
moving into his summer residence
triple digits will most likely
stick around til September
ends                 green
bougainvillea thrives

NaPoWriMo Prompt – Because it’s a Saturday, I have an (optional) prompt for you that takes a little time to work through — although you can certainly take short-cuts through it, if you like! The prompt, which you can find in its entirety here, was  developed by the poet and teacher Hoa Nguyen, asks you to use a long poem by James Schuyler as a guidepost for your poem. (You may remember James Schuyler from our poetry resource for Day 2.) This is a prompt that allows you to sink deeply into another poet’s work, as well as your own.

Good morning and welcome to day twenty-five of napowrimo. I read the prompt before I went out to my morning coffee spot. I’ve been sitting out there enjoying my coffee almost every morning since Shawn set up the table and bench at the end of March. He put a black sunshade over it yesterday. This morning as I sat and watched the dog and tortoise I was in a little cocoon. The second photo is of Speedy’s summer residence, notice the hole behind the fallen chair. He moved back into his other residence over the winter and just began digging out his summer home earlier this week.

Anyhow this is life as it occurs in my backyard. I’m not quite sure it answers the prompt exactly but it’s what came out of my free write. It’s almost noon here and I pretty much spent my morning writing, so I have to get going on housework.

 

#NaPoWriMo Eeyore Acrostic

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NaPoWriMo Prompt – Today’s prompt (optional, as always) asks you to write a poem about a particular letter of the alphabet, or perhaps, the letters that form a short word. Doesn’t “S” look sneaky and snakelike? And “W” clearly doesn’t know where it’s going! Think about the shape of the letter(s), and use that as the take-off point for your poem.

Good afternoon and welcome to day twenty-three of napowrimo and I decided to go off prompt. It just didn’t seem to speak to me not as much as Eeyore does anyway. And now I’m trying to mess with the formatting to get the letters to line up how I want. We’ll see if this works.

#NaPoWriMo Idioms

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Me sporting my quarantine haircut 

Les carottes sont cuites!

Coiffure
homespun trimming
Razor sheers off ragged mop
Laugh at how the carrots are cooked
Haircut

NaPoWriMo Prompt – Our (optional) prompt for the day asks you to engage with different languages and cultures through the lens of proverbs and idiomatic phrases. Many different cultures have proverbs or phrases that have largely the same meaning, but are expressed in different ways. For example, in English we say “his bark is worse than his bite,” but the same idea in Spanish would be stated as “the lion isn’t as fierce as his painting.” Today, I’d like to challenge you to find an idiomatic phrase from a different language or culture, and use it as the jumping-off point for your poem. Here’s are a few lists to help get you started: One, two, three.

Good afternoon readers and welcome to day twenty-two of NaPoWriMo and me showing off my quarantine haircut. Yes, on Saturday I let Robin take a razor to my hair. The hairdresser uses a number 4 blade; how hard can it be mom? Well I should have kept him away from the bangs. I was told it was because my head was tilted, but the hairdresser is suppose to insure their client is looking straight ahead. I’m still not sure how they got this short; I did say bangs are hard and I like them just above the eyebrow. I really have no idea how they were cut as the scissors were never near my eyes.

Oh well both Robin and Gretchen were like, you’re just going to have an awkward phase mom. It’s a good thing I’m stuck at home and no one can see me. 😉 Except I just posted a picture of the do with a face mask my mother-in-law made. It’s actually not the first bad haircut I’ve had and on the plus side this one was free. I’m pretty sure it will grow out sufficiently to be fixed by an actual hairdresser once the stay at home order is lifted.

#NaPoWriMo An Ode On Saturday Morning

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The Rosebush

Copious buds bloom
Petals lay bare on sidewalk
Nothing gold can stay

NaPoWriMo Prompt – Our optional prompt for the day also honors the idea of Saturday (the Saturdays of the soul, perhaps?), by challenging you to write an ode to life’s small pleasures. Perhaps it’s the first sip of your morning coffee. Or finding some money in the pockets of an old jacket. Discovering a bird’s nest in a lilac bush or just looking up at the sky and watching the clouds go by.

Good morning and welcome to day eighteen of napowrimo where my ode to the rosebush looks suspiciously like a haiku with a borrowed line no less.  Here is the link to read Robert Frost’s poem. I grabbed the link from poets.org as they are running a shelter in poems series, asking readers to share poems they are reflecting on while we are sheltering in place. My favorite Frost poem, A question, doesn’t seem to be in their archives. I used it on a previous napowrimo for a golden shovel.

Yesterday we ventured outside headed off to the mailbox. Robin’s reading care package from Changing Hands Bookstore seems to be MIA. As we walked down the sidewalk, Robin was hit in the face by a flying object and exclaimed, What was that? Gretchen responded, I think it was a petal from the rosebush. They’re all over the sidewalk. Yes, it was pretty windy yesterday and rose petals were dropping off and flying away. On top of being hit in the face there was no book in the mailbox. 😦 Maybe today will be a good mail day.

#NaPoWriMo DEAR Day

 

DEAR Day

Drop everything and read a good book
in celebration of Cleary’s birthday
Find a quiet place where no one will look
Drop everything and read a good book
Lose yourself and let the pages sink their hook
into you as the story unfolds stay
Drop everything and read a good book
in celebration of Cleary’s birthday 

NaPoWriMo Prompt – For today’s prompt (optional, as always), I’d like to challenge you to write a triolet. These eight-line poems involve repeating lines and a tight rhyme scheme. The repetitions and rhymes can lend themselves to humorous poems, as well as to poems expressing dramatic or sorrowful moods. And sometimes the repetitions can be used in deceptive ways, by splitting the words in a given line into different sentences, and making subtle changes, as in this powerful triolet by Sandra McPherson.

Good morning readers, guess what day it is? One of my favorite days of NaPoWriMo day twelve also known as Beverly Cleary’s birthday or DEAR Day. And I’ve gotten pretty good at celebrating the day in poetry before going off to read.

So both Gretchen and Robin have been venturing to the mailbox the past couple days, anxiously awaiting their reading care packages from Changing Hands Bookstore. There was one extremely big envelope in yesterday’s mail addressed to Gretchen. It was so big, Robin figured it was a twofer and his book was also included. Alas it was not to be, Gretchen received a massive book that actually piqued all of our interest.

Since DEAR Day also landed on Easter this year, I can’t exactly drop everything but I will find some time to read today. I hope all my readers do too. 😉

 

#NaPoWriMo Concrete Poem

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Card in my reading care package from Changing Hands Bookstore 

Serendipity

Stumbling upon
Happy chance
Kismet
Luck
Fortune smiles on you

NaPoWriMo Prompt – Our prompt for the day (optional as always) is inspired by Kaschock’s use of space to organize her poems. Today, I’d like to challenge you to write a “concrete” poem – a poem in which the lines and words are organized to take a shape that reflects in some way the theme of the poem. This might seem like a very modernist idea, but poets have been writing concrete poems since the 1600s! Your poem can take a simple shape, like a box or ball, or maybe you’ll have fun trying something more elaborate, like this poem in the shape of a Christmas tree.

Good morning readers and welcome to day nine of napowrimo where we get to write a shape poem. The first time I participated in NaPoWriMo I wrote a concrete poem in the shape of a teapot (the format does not work on mobile devices so I hope everyone is on a computer). Since then I have written a few more concrete poems including teacup dictionary poems.

As it happens the word serendipity has been on my mind. I used it in my April 4 post on dreams, thinking our dinner discussion the previous night was rather serendipitous. After that I was looking at my care package from Changing Hands Bookstore and saw the card explaining serendipity – it has suited my needs quite well.

Commander Riker – “Fate. Protects fools, little children, and ships named Enterprise.” (Star Trek)

For anyone interested on a how to teacup dictionary poem. Happy writing! I hope fortune smiles on everyone today as well as the rest of April.

#NaPoWriMo News Article Poem

Comfort Masks

Masks
Give comfort
Wear in public
Stop virus from spreading
Cover

NaPoWriMo Prompt – And speaking of news, today our prompt (optional, of course) is another oldie-but-goodie: a poem based on a news article. Frankly, I understand why you might be avoiding the news lately, but this is a good opportunity to find some “weird” and poetical news stories for inspiration.

Good morning readers and welcome to day seven of NaPoWriMo where I contribute to the mask debate. I saw a story on the news about making and donating comfort masks here in Arizona. One of the drop off locations is in Sun City, close to my mother-in-law (she’s the seamstress not me) so I shared the article with her yesterday. When I read today’s prompt that was the news article I thought of first. And my long time readers should know by now I like short poems. It’s funny to realize my extra tidbits on the daily prompts are the most I’ve typed in quite some time.

Before I go, a link to my niece’s etsy page if anyone is looking to buy comfort masks. And for all my readers who are also participating in NaPoWriMo – Congratulations we have hit the one week mark! Keep writing my friends.

#NaPoWriMo Backyard Garden

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Tortoise enjoys a treat

Backyard Garden

Tortoise
surveys his kingdom
slow and
methodical

Little dog
scurries about
seeking an audience

NaPoWriMo Prompt – Today’s (optional) prompt is ekphrastic in nature – but rather particular! Today, I’d like to challenge you to write a poem from the point of view of one person/animal/thing from Hieronymous Bosch’s famous (and famously bizarre) triptych The Garden of Earthly Delights. Whether you take the position of a twelve-legged clam, a narwhal with a cocktail olive speared on its horn, a man using an owl as a pool toy, or a backgammon board being carried through a crowd by a fish wearing a tambourine on its head, I hope that you find the experience deliriously amusing. And if the thought of speaking in the voice of a porcupine-as-painted-by-a-man-who-never-saw-one leaves you cold, perhaps you might write from the viewpoint of Bosch himself? Very little is known about him, so there’s plenty of room for invention, embroidery, and imagination.

Good morning readers and welcome to day six of napowrimo. I’m not sure my septolet is exactly on point, but back in my early bird post I wrote about how Shawn has been working on a garden in our backyard. He also put together a nice sitting area (where Gretchen and I took her birthday photo with the  pink garland filter). I have been spending my mornings out there, drinking my coffee. It is also where I was reading my book. Since I finished the book, I decided to take my poetry journal out there this morning hoping for inspiration. The septolet came from watching the dog and tortoise interact though I’m not too sure I’d really call it interaction. The tortoise seems to tolerate the dog’s nonsense.

Well my coffee is finished and my poem is written so I guess I have to get on with my Monday. I hope everyone is hanging in and finding inspiration in their everyday life. As I wrote later in the day yesterday –

Wish for excitement
Life continues as normal
Keep towel handy

Yes, my life has had barely a blip with the stay at home order, but if any alien ships show up in orbit I do know where my towel is. 😉 And no I would never intermingle two different sci-fi domains.

#NaPoWriMo First Contact Day

Keep a safe distance
First time greeting aliens
Live long and prosper

Star Trek: First Contact 1996

Captain Jean-Luc Picard : The date. Data, I need to know the exact date.
Lieutenant Commander Data : April 4th, 2063.
Cmdr. William Riker : April 4th, the day before first contact.
Lieutenant Commander Data : Precisely.

 

Hello readers and welcome to day five of NaPoWriMo – aka First Contact Day. Sorry for the interruption of your regularly scheduled prompt.
NaPoWriMo Prompt Our (optional) prompt for today is one that we have used in past years, but which I love to come back to, because it so often takes me to new and unusual places, and results in fantastic poems. It’s called the “Twenty Little Poetry Projects,” and was originally developed by Jim Simmerman. The challenge is to use/do all of the following in the same poem. Of course,  if you can’t fit all twenty projects into your poem, or a few of them get your poem going, that is just fine too!

In other news, we pulled off a very successful birthday celebration yesterday (the day before first contact).

 

Festive ambiance
Wish many happy returns
Casa de Hosking

Decorate backyard
She does not reveal her wish
Quarantine party

The dinner portion of last night’s celebration was a bit tricky. We all went to Hayashi Hibachi for Shawn’s birthday at the end of February and Gretchen actually ate and enjoyed the sushi. She wanted to make a return trip for her birthday and then the stay at home order came. Well even before then, restaurants weren’t offering dine-in services, but I told her there is no problem ordering take-out. Mom was wrong Hayashi Hibachi has virtually no online presence and we could not find a menu to view. Shawn actually drove over to the restaurant; yes management is aware of the sucky online presence but they’re a chain and don’t have much of a say. Dad took pictures of the sushi options and we made our selection here at home; Dad placed the order and then went over to Total Wine to wait. He actually took a picture of the parking lot as no one was around except for the wine store. Yes folks if you have to be stuck indoors with your family for a month and more we all need alcoholic beverages to cope. Of course in my opinion, a little bit of poetry doesn’t hurt. Hope every has a safe and happy first contact day!