#NaPoWriMo 2019 Day 5

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Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy

 

Fortune Cookie

Don’t Panic
Excellent advice except
It left out one important detail –

Always carry a towel

It has great practical value
Wrap it around you for warmth
Lie on it to bask in the sun
Sleep under it beneath the stars
Wet it for use in hand-to-hand-combat
If you manage to keep it halfway clean
Dry yourself off

Don’t panic
Is not sufficient advice

NaPoWriMo Prompt Day 5 – Following Dargan’s lead, today we’d like to challenge you to write a poem that incorporates at least one of the following: (1) the villanelle form, (2) lines taken from an outside text, and/or (3) phrases that oppose each other in some way. If you can use two elements, great – and if you can do all three, wow!

Good morning and welcome to day 5 of NaPoWriMo also known as First Contact Day. My math isn’t always the best, but I believe it’s only 44 more years until we meet aliens from outer space. Shawn showed me the fortune he received last night, and I told him it was missing something very important. He said, I know in bed. Umm…no not exactly. Always carry your towel. Since we were asked to use lines from an outside text in today’s prompt, I guess you could call this a found poem. If you are lucky enough to meet a Vulcan in the future don’t forget your towel. My love of sci-fi. Not too sure how much I love my husband right now, totally missing The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy reference.

NapoWriMo Day 9

p.103 Stardust by: Neil Gaiman

p.103 Stardust by: Neil Gaiman

Glittering Dust

lump of mud
burying
the star, the girl
a numbskull, a coxcomb
Tristan
unwound silver chain and slipped it
around girl’s slim wrist
stared up beyond outrage
Taking you home
violently wick afloat
the candle flame flared
illuminating the girl
chain unbreakable
the candle went out

NaPoWriMo Prompt – Our prompt for the day (optional, as always) plays of our resources. Today, I challenge you to write a visual poem. If that’s not specific enough, perhaps you can try your hand at a calligram? That’s a poem or other text in which the words are arranged into a specific shape or image. You might find inspiration in the famous calligrams written by Guillaume Apollinaire. And a word to the wise — the best way to cope with today’s exercise may well be to abandon your keyboard, and sit down with paper and pen (and maybe crayons or colored pencils or markers!)

Did someone say color? I can do this. An erasure poem from p. 103 Stardust by: Neil Gaiman. I tried getting the words off the page in the shape of a star, but I couldn’t seem to get the formatting to work. As it looks now, it reminds me of a keyhole.

NaPoWriMo Day Eight – Rewrite

There is no vessel like a book
You’ll be transported by page
Poorest soul can leave his cage
A sing-song verse
Will quickly immerse
Dear reader, in its depth
Frugal means to gain breadth
Of knowledge, reading will hook!

A Book

There is no frigate like a book
To take us lands away,
Nor any coursers like a page
Of prancing poetry.
This traverse may the poorest take
Without oppress of toll;
How frugal is the chariot
That bears a human soul!
Emily Dickinson

 

NaPoWriMo Prompt – And now for today’s (optional, as always!) prompt. Today, let’s rewrite a famous poem, giving it our own spin. While any famous poem will do, if you haven’t already got one in mind, why not try your own version of Cesar Vallejo’s Black Stone Lying on a White Stone? If you’re not exactly sure how such a poem could be “re-written,” check out this recent poem by Stephen Burt, which riffs on Vallejo’s. Happy writing!

Waiting at the bus stop with Gretchen this morning, another student came up holding Cinder by: Marissa Meyer.  Gretchen just finished reading the third book in the series.  We started talking about how good the books are.  I love when kids love reading. 😀 I’m early but April 12th is DEAR day in honor of Beverly Cleary’s birthday.  Everyone should – Drop Everything And Read.  I wrote a double dactyl for DEAR day one year.

In the middle of NaPoWriMo, I am also reading Kilroy was Here by: Douglas Quinn.  It’s a children’s book; I will write a review of when I’m finished. I’m thinking I may include a found poem in my review.  My oldest daughter has to write three book reports outside of her English class.  One of the suggestions is to write a found poem from a page in the book.  Rachael thought it was too easy to be real.  But I assured her found poetry is a legit assignment.  She has done two of the three reports. No found poem by her yet.