NaPoWriMo 2016 Day 27

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Poets.0rg April Poster

 

Cultivating Poetry

We
Find
Ourselves
The final
Wednesday writing
Long lines. I start slowly building
Syllable count line by line using Fibonacci
Numbers. One repeats becoming two then three to five adds up to eight becomes thirteen.
The sequence can be carried on as far as one wishes to multiply poetic lines; however the lines do grow unwieldy as weeds.
After climbing up to thirty-four, it is time to trim syllable count line by line.
Twenty-one falls to thirteen, then eight is cut to five.
A gardener cultivates crops
As a poet tends
To meter
And rhyme
Verse
Grows

NaPoWriMo Prompt – Today’s prompt comes to us from Megan Pattie, who points us to the work of the Irish poet Ciaran Carson, who increasingly writes using very long lines. Carson has stated that his lines are (partly) based on the seventeen syllables of the haiku, and that he strives to achieve the clarity of the haiku in each line. So today, Megan and I collectively challenge you to write a poem with very long lines. You can aim for seventeen syllables, but that’s just a rough guide. If you’re having trouble buying into the concept of long lines, maybe this essay on Whitman’s infamously leggy verse will convince you of their merits. Happy writing!

Long lines, ewww. I’m not really a fan. My attempts at prose poetry always seem to fall short. Also I just prefer short poetry. But since we are suppose to write long lines, I thought I would work on a Fibonacci verse and build up to a 34 syllable line.

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